The Letter Project

September 30, 2012

Special Delivery (408)

Filed under: Mailart — Theresa Williams @ 5:04 pm
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More SMALL THINGS from Simon Warren, UK

September 24, 2012

Special Delivery (406, 407)

Filed under: Mailart — Theresa Williams @ 5:32 pm
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Hallowe’en mailart from Angie & Snooky (top) and Nadine Wendell-Mojica, both of USA

September 23, 2012

Special Delivery (405)

Filed under: Mailart — Theresa Williams @ 12:58 am
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Zombie mail from Niklas Heed, Gothenburg, Sweden:

Special Delivery (404)

Filed under: Letters — Theresa Williams @ 12:39 am
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Letter from Whitney Reinhard to Suzy Anderson

 

Letter from Whitney Reinhard to Suzy Anderson (back)

The Mailart Adventures of Baby Zombo (403)

Filed under: Mailart — Theresa Williams @ 12:27 am
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Portrait 11 went to Svenja Wahl, Germany

 

Special Delivery (402)

Filed under: Mailart — Theresa Williams @ 12:12 am
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Phoenix, watercolor by Suzy Anderson

 

Phoenix watercolor by Suzy Anderson (back); original poem by Suzy Anderson

 

This is part of a series of watercolor paintings with original poems, by Suzy Anderson. For more about this project, see Suzy’s letter:  Special Delivery 396

 

 

September 22, 2012

Special Delivery (401)

Filed under: Letters — Theresa Williams @ 11:57 pm
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SMALL THINGS from Simon Warren, UK

Special Delivery (400)

Filed under: Mailart — Theresa Williams @ 11:52 pm
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SMALL THINGS from Simon Warren, UK

Special Delivery (399)

Filed under: Mailart — Theresa Williams @ 11:47 pm
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More SMALL THINGS from Simon Warren, UK

Special Delivery (398)

Filed under: Mailart — Theresa Williams @ 11:34 pm
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Special Delivery (397)

Filed under: Letters,Mailart — Theresa Williams @ 11:17 pm
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Handwritten card from Suzy Anderson

 

Front and back of handwritten card from Suzy Anderson

Special Delivery (396)

Filed under: Letters,Mailart — Theresa Williams @ 10:52 pm
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Windmills, watercolor by Suzy Anderson

31 August 2012

Dear Theresa,

I always love your envelopes and small things, but I especially enjoyed the typewriter with wings on the envelope and so what? And the yin yang cartoon from The New Yorker. Mary loved the organ and bats on the back of the envelope.

The penny does have value. I just purchased a copy of The Diary of Soren Kierkegaard myself for a penny. Thank you for sharing some of the entries with me. The barb is applicable because I feel like even though I want to be free of the past, I am also afraid to lose it. Perhaps I feel like I’ll lose a part of my identity if the past is entirely let go. I hope I bother to do the sums myself instead of cheating. Sometimes the noise lets me focus more deeply on myself and forge new surroundings. Mary prefers to work in silence while I prefer to work with some noise (music or other people milling about) and we thought this could be because my household as a child was silent except for outbursts and her house was loud.

“The Unnerving Embrace of a Vague Idea” sounds like a great book title! It amazes me to find lines of poetry that have been used for book titles. One beauty about writing for me is to adopt another’s persona and from the experience learn more about my own identity. There was a quote on WordPress recently that struck me: The art of writing is the art of discovering what you believe. Gustave Flaubert

I’m still discovering the reasons why I’m wearing Charlotte’s name. It’s like acting and putting on a different mask for each project.

Amazing how people jump to conclusions about being reserved and aloof. I’m glad Allen said they didn’t know you. Being aloof has definitely been a defensive mechanism for me. I think I learned that if I left myself be vulnerable in front of others, they would attack, make fun, and manipulate me. I’m glad I have a rich inner life. I don’t resent my own company and can be solitary, but I can also connect to others I trust.

Thank you for the compliment! I will have to use it in my novel. Sometimes I feel like there’s a piece missing, but I think it might be because I’ve never really been to Missouri. I’m planning a trip to go in September. Whenever I go to a new place, I absorb what’s around me. Once my aunt called me a sponge and said she wanted to travel with me just to watch me absorb the place. Christine says I fall in love with every place I go to (like Chicago and New Orleans). Without falling in love with a place I can’t learn its personality and commit the city and sights to memory.

When Mary and I get Netflix, I will have to check out The Sopranos.

I think every writer should go at his or her own pace. Not every writer who produces multiple books a year is an improving writer. When I was a teenager I started reading Garth Nix’s work. He is Australian and writes fantasy and science fiction. I kept up with his works till I discovered that he did not improve over a period of five years, using similar language and plotlines. I was disappointed. What broke him from the list of my favorite authors was reading a book he co-authored. I still love the first books I read, like “Sabriel,” “The Ragwitch,” and “Shade’s Children,” but I can’t read his new work. I have to improve and try new things, or I won’t be satisfied with my writing. When I attempt short stories, poems, novels, scripts, and letters, I’m trying to approach it from different angles like short, concrete, indented poems, etc. I’m not sticking to the script I discovered that works. Garth Nix is not the only author that I have a problem with in this area. Hilari Bell too did a wonderful job with the Farsala trilogy and “The Goblin Wall” was good but I didn’t care for the sequel. I still admire their work but have learned that I need to continue climbing the mountain and not stay stuck on a ledge admiring the same flowers.

I do want to have a presence online with Twitter and Facebook, but I am going to focus on writing. The shy ones are just as valuable as the relentless authors. I haven’t heard of Klout. I’m not sure I want to sign up and be assigned a number. What about tracking who buys the books and reads them? That is certainly one way for the writer to reach readers and isn’t included in Klout’s numbers.

A chapbook is a great idea. Here’s my next page.

I started watercolor this week. I already used all of the sheets I purchased last week. I’m sending you “Don Quijote vs. Windmill Giants” because I love reading about Don Quijote. Even saw a piece at the museums in California that reminded me of him and Sancho Panza. I hope you enjoy the windmill flowers as Don Quijote prepares for battle.

Watercolor plus your last letter about phoenixes plus the reminder of The Letter Project albums on Facebook created a new project. I made eleven watercolor paintings of phoenixes titled “Firsts.” I’m working on writing poems on the back and mailing them to different people. I’ll put up the entire collection on Facebook.

 Love,

Suzy

Special Delivery (395)

Filed under: Letters — Theresa Williams @ 8:50 pm
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August 27, 2012

Dear Whitney,

Thank you! Congrats on finishing the first revision of your short story. I would love to read it. Feel free to send it either way, mail or email. Definitely let the story sit for a bit before going back to it. I’m still working on the short story I told you about earlier this summer.

Well, the nice thing about writing my novel by hand was the portability. I could slip the notebook into my purse and write as I waited for new tires to be put on my car. I didn’t write the entire draft in a month, which in November I bet my hand will be in a permanent claw formation. Because it’s in journal entries, I would write 2 or 3 a day, and only one day I wrote 11 entries. Truly inspired that day! Even though I can type 77 words per minute, I find that writing by hand lets me connect with Charlotte because she’s writing by hand. The sketchbook I’m using is 6’’x 6’’, a square orange. The blank pages have let me be free in HOW LARGE I write or very small, or even if I want to draw or sketch, just like Charlotte would. It would be neat when it’s published to be that size and have a font that looks like handwriting. I did figure out how she signs her name:

Charlotte Lynelle Peterson

Which helped me get a further personality sketch. She writes slower to make sure her handwriting is legible and draws out the “t” in Peterson (and I don’t). My hand will probably cramp up from typing the novel! Oh goodness, I can’t wait to hear your reactions to her adventures. Lol.

We had two pairs of identical twins in my school and a pair of fraternal twins (so easy to tell them apart), but I never could get the identical ones straight, even when one of them was in one of my group projects.

My summer reading list definitely overshadowed “On the Road.” I would like to read the same biographies that you read first. Then we could read the novel and check out his letters. I have read his book of haikus and you should check it out because it’s awesome. Lot of cats.

I’ve read “The Kite Runner” in high school. It was one of my favorite books we read that year. Have you ever read “In the Lake of the Woods” by Tim O’Brien? He does a great job with footnotes in the novel. Oh, Othello, thine heart was born so pure, only to crackle into ash. Poor Desdemona. Lol about scribings.

Thank you about my energy astounding you. I was so surprised myself to look back and see that I did so much in one day. One reason I keep a notebook of what I worked on is so that I can visually see how much writing/reading I am doing. Keeps me honest. Yep, what works for one writer isn’t perfectly transferred to another. Plus journaling is part of “The Artist’s Way” where they like the students to write a minimum of 3 pages a day and have an artist date once a week (like an activity to do with your inner child). It’s helping me realize how much I loved art classes in school and how I want to continue making art and writing. I went to Hobby Lobby and bought watercolor paper, scrapbook paper, and pendants to learn how to make necklaces and bracelets. Definitely a dangerous store for me!

It’s great that you can run 5k’s with your Dad. My Dad and I would go for walks around grocery stores so he could exercise and we would have time to talk. So it’s kinda funny that I work in a grocery store now!

It’s amazing how cruel kids can be. I agree that “it’s what we do after the teasing stops that’s important.” Whitney, you became a running machine who does 5k’s and is clearly beautiful. You should see that whenever you look into a mirror. You are a great writer who is published and will only get better. Thank you for the encouragement.

I hope your teacher writes back too. I would like to get in touch with my English teacher Miss Gorsuch. I had her for both AP English lit and language. We had lunch after I finished my freshman year at BG, but I haven’t spoken to her since.

I wish I was relaxing on a beach! A baby-pool filled with sand would be a great idea in the apartment, though from experience I know sand gets everywhere. I’ll settle for bath salts and a mini-vacation in September.

I’m glad the mail lady loved the trampoline and stick figure! It was totally inspired by your last letter. What a character!

Have you ever made anything with duct tape? I’ve been wanting to learn how to make roses and whatnot.

Suzy

P.S. I’m so glad “Holy Roller” found a home. Such a great poem and memories of Larissa’s class that semester.

P.P.S. I got accepted at Dzanc Books as an editorial intern. Loving the reading assignments so far.

An artsy version of Suzy’s letter can be seen here:  Letter_to_Whitney_Aug_27_2012

September 14, 2012

The Mailart Adventures of Baby Zombo (394)

Filed under: Mailart — Theresa Williams @ 10:29 pm
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Portrait #10 of Baby Zombo was sent to Suzy Anderson

The Mailart Adventures of Baby Zombo (393)

Filed under: Mailart — Theresa Williams @ 10:22 pm
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Portrait #9 of Baby Zombo was sent to Carina Granlund, the Netherlands

The Mailart Adventures of Baby Zombo (392)

Filed under: Mailart — Theresa Williams @ 10:15 pm
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Portrait #8 of Baby Zombo was sent to Christine Brandel

The Mailart Adventures of Baby Zombo (391)

Filed under: Mailart — Theresa Williams @ 10:09 pm
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Portrait #7 of Baby Zombo was sent to Whitney Reinhard

Special Delivery (390)

Filed under: Letters — Theresa Williams @ 10:02 pm
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More SMALL THINGS from Simon Warren, UK

Special Delivery (389)

Filed under: Letters — Theresa Williams @ 9:57 pm
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More SMALL THINGS from Simon Warren, UK

Special Delivery (388)

Filed under: Letters — Theresa Williams @ 9:40 pm
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More SMALL THINGS from Simon Warren, UK

Special Delivery (387)

Filed under: Letters — Theresa Williams @ 9:31 pm
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More SMALL THINGS from Simon Warren, UK

Special Delivery (386)

Filed under: Letters,Mailart — Theresa Williams @ 9:03 pm
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Letter from Jack Galmitz, page 1

Illustrated letter concerning writing and art from Jack Galmitz.   Page one (above).  Subsequent pages (below).  ADDENDUM:  Photo sent to me through email with the following note:

Theresa, is it too late to attach this to the poem “I Write” as an
illustration? I know I didn’t mail it, but it seems to capture the
complexity mechanically of the simple phrase-an illustration of the
poem.
Jack

Letter from Jack Galmitz, page 2

Letter from Jack Galmitz, page 3

Letter from Jack Galmitz, page 4

Letter from Jack Galmitz, page 5

Letter from Jack Galmitz, page 6

Letter from Jack Galmitz, page 7

Letter from Jack Galmitz, page 8

The poem that was inspired by a letter exchange between Jack Galmitz and Theresa Williams, page 1

Jack’s poem, page 2

ADDENDUM:  An illustration based on the poem, sent to me in an email from Jack Galmitz:

September 9, 2012

Special Delivery (385)

Filed under: Letters — Theresa Williams @ 7:22 pm
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UPDATE:  Unfortunately, I have had to remove the Updike correspondence because Claude has informed me that the lawyer for the Updike estate forbids publication of any Updike correspondence, even on the Internet. 

I received an email recently from Claude Clayton Smith, asking if I’d be interested in posting his correspondence with John Updike. 

I’m thrilled to do so. 

Subsequently, Claude sent copies of his correspondence with Updike to me through the mail, along with a very informative letter.

You can hear a podcast about  Claude Smith’s relationship with John Updike here:  The Drunken Odyssey 

In the podcast, you’ll hear about Claude’s relationship to Updike’s stories and books, as well as his correspondence with Updike.  It’s well worth listening to.

Page 1 of Claude Smith’s correspondence to me regarding his correspondence with John Updike. (addresses removed)

 I was able to find a used copy of the Epistolary issue of Pig Iron at Amazon.  Pig Iron No. 17 is edited by Jim Villani and Naton Leslie and includes work by many writers and artists, including:  Jim Clark, Eve Shelnutt, Larry Smith, Claude Smith, Antler, Laurel Speer, and Barry Whitesell.   Below is an image of the front cover:

Front Cover of Epistolary Issue from Pig Iron Press.

Back Cover of Epistolary Issue from Pig Iron Press

The Mailart Adventures of Baby Zombo (384)

Filed under: Mailart — Theresa Williams @ 6:07 pm
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Sent to Vizma Bruns, Australia

Portrait #6

Special Delivery (383)

Filed under: Letters — Theresa Williams @ 5:50 pm
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SMALL THINGS from Simon Warren, UK

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